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extreme-weather-greatest-economic-risk LONDON: January 17, 2018. The latest Global Risks Report from the World Economic Forum (WEF) says extreme weather events are...
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uk-roro-freight-depends-on-future-eu-accessLONDON: January 16, 2018. The UK short-sea ferry industry is spending over £1 billion on new ships, port and service facilities in the...

Alternative Facts

CHARLOTTE, NC: January 26, 2017. Seems Donald Trump's abrogation of U.S. participation in the Trans Pacific Partnership, and intention of renegotiating the 22 year-old free trade agreement with Mexico and Canada, is a bid to validate his election slogan "Make America Great Again".

Trump's "America First" declaration at his inauguration on January 20 echoed similar intent by a predecessor: In 1846 U.S. president James Polk authorized the invasion of Mexico based on the 'Manifest Destiny' that the U.S. should keep Texas and acquire New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Colorado and California.

Polk supported the idea that America should be one land stretching from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego.

In 1848, at the end of the two-year war with Mexico, the defeated president Porfirio Díaz was to comment: "Alas poor Mexico, so far from God, so close to the United States."

Now, some 168 years later, Trump wants to add future insult to past injury by making Mexico pay for a wall to further separate the two countries, by threatening U.S. car manufacturers based in Mexico with an import surcharge, and by forcibly removing undocumented Mexican immigrants from large parts of America their ancestors used to own.


This week FedEx chairman Fred Smith, who knows a lot more about free trade than most, reiterated his December presentation in Washington, DC about how NAFTA and similar agreements lift all airplanes and not just the ones owned by billionaires. It can be downloaded here: How-Trade-Keeps-America-Great-FWS-12-9-16.pdf

- Simon Keeble is the editorial director of HU Digital Media, publisher of Freightweek.

 

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